National Trust: Tyntesfield

The National Trust was founded in 1895. As a charity they want to preserve heritage and open spaces, for everyone to enjoy. They look after houses, buildings and gardens to coast and countryside. The National Trust can be found throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

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Tytnesfield.jpg

They restore the buildings, protect them and open them up to everyone. They have over 500 historic houses, castles, gardens and parks and nature reserves. You can buy tickets whilst visiting or purchase a membership card. If you’re under the age of 25, you can purchase a young persons card. This is just over thirty pounds a year and is great if you’re looking for things to do in the summer. We use this a lot and enjoy having picnics in the gardens.

Tytnesfield.jpg
Tytnesfield.jpg

If you’re nearby to Bristol, Tyntesfield is a must to visit. Tyntesfield was saved in 2002 by public contributions, the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Heritage Lottery Fund! William Gibbs purchased the property in 1844 and he went about making it his own. He remodelled the exterior of the house into the Gothic theme that exists today and had the interiors decorated and furnished.

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Tytnesfield.jpg

Over 60,000 pieces have been catalogued at Tyntesfield. These include everything from paintings and furnishings to kitchenware and picnic sets. It is the largest recorded collection owned and cared for by the National Trust! The architecture, woodwork and stonework around the house is stunning. Every room has been thought about carefully with the colours and furnishings.

Tytnesfield.jpg
Tytnesfield.jpg

There is lots to see around the house. If you ask the volunteers about the house, you will find a lot more about the furnishings and paintings. Once you have walked around the house, you will be able to visit the chapel. Tyntesfield has a chapel, which very few Victorian houses had. It was private to the Gibbs family. William Gibbs commissioned the building of the chapel in 1873.

Tytnesfield.jpg
Tytnesfield.jpg

The terraces were created in the 1850s and were gradually improved by each member of the Gibbs family. There are lots of gardens to visit at Tyntesfield. The Kitchen Garden has been providing fruit and vegetables for the Tyntesfield estate since the 1860s! Today, the majority of the produce is used in the Cow Barn restaurant, with the rest available to take home, for a donation, from the produce table. You can purchase flowers, vegetables and fruit.

Tytnesfield.jpg
Tytnesfield.jpg

There is lots of tasty food on offer in the Cow Barn Restaurant and Pavilion Cafe. It is inspired by the Gibbs family. Where possible, the National Trust source as many ingredients as possible from the estate. When visiting, we tried the goats cheese salad. We also had ginger beer as a drink. It was delicious! The salad was from the garden.

Tyntesfield.jpg
Tytnesfield.jpg

The Rose Garden is a quiet and sheltered retreat with hedging, a covered archway and lots of plants! Paradise is another garden which was named by the Gibbs family. It is an arboretum with a collection of specimen trees brought from all over the world to grow at Tyntesfield.

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Tytnesfield.jpg

If you’re interested in visiting, tickets for adults cost £18.40 and children £9.20. This will give you access to the house and gardens. These are the opening hours for Monday to Saturday. The opening hours may differ on a Sunday and during bank holidays. You can find all the information on the National Trust website.

House: 11:00 - Last entry 16:00

Café: 10:30 - 17:00

Estate: 10:00 - 18:00

Garden: 10:00 - 18:00

Restaurant: 10:00 - 17:30

Shop: 10:00 - 17:30

If you’re looking for other things to do nearby to Bristol, then make sure to visit Lacock, Bath and Clevedon Court.

Tytnesfield.jpg
Tytnesfield.jpg